The Story of the Ramchargers

 

 

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The Story of the Ramchargers

During the 1960s drag racing produced dozens of racing stars; Don “The Snake” Prudehome, “Big Daddy” Don Garlitz, and the Socks and Martin team. But one name had more innovations, more technology, and more fan enthusiasm, than any other. That name belongs to a group of guys who had the same passion: making Mopars go as fast as possible and beat anyone on the racetrack. They called themselves the Ramchargers. The Ramchargers were drag racing’s first dream team. All of them were young men in their 20s, and practically all of them were Chrysler engineers. From 8 to 5 Monday through Friday they helped Chrysler Corporation produce some of the muscle cars era’s most powerful hardware. But on the weekends they took this SuperStock hardware to the racetrack and blew everyone away. Starting in 1958 and racing through 1967, the Ramchargers did more than any one else to create Chrysler Corporation’s high-performance image. They also shared their speed secrets with all of Chrysler’s other racing teams. And in their spare time the group in those candy striped cars became the most successful and popular drag race team the young sport had ever seen. What makes this success all the more amazing is the fact that this group did this on their own.

Despite what many people thought, the Ramchargers wasn’t a high dollar Chrysler sponsored racing team; they started out as a car club. Quoting engine builder Dan Mancini; “We had a group of 10 or 12 guys who were really devoted, then we had other members of the Ramchargers that came and went. Most of them were engineers, we got together a couple times a month, meeting after work”. Jim Thorton shared the driving with other members like Herm Mosser, and Mike Buckle who eventually became the club president. When Mike joined up the Ramchargers were already becoming famous. “I had read about the Ramchargers in the hot rod magazines before I went to work at Chrysler in February 1960. In the engine lab, there were two people in that group that were Ramchargers. So at that point I felt that I had died and gone to heaven that they invited me to one of the meetings, and then later to join this elite club.” Gary Congdon was a fuel system specialist from Holly (the carburetor manufacturer) on loan to Chrysler Corporation; a little networking brought him into the club. Tom Coddington, another Ramcharger engineer stated, “Chrysler was a very unique organization at that time, while it was a big company you still got to know everybody. Everyone was approachable in engineering and everybody was helpful. It was a great place for young engineer to start out.” A funny looking 1949 Plymouth was their first track car, built a few months after their first meeting, it was called The High and Mighty. Tom Coddington also added “It was quite an exotic car, we did some very successful things on the track with its suspension. It was a low-budget car with parts from members’ personal collections. It had a jacked up suspension, an outlandishly tall intake manifold that was the first Tunnel Ram, and wild looking trumpet-like exhaust headers. The plan was to get the center of gravity up as high as possible; to get the weight transfer to the rear tires hence more traction. A tuned link intake manifold was added to get more power using those long Ramair resonator tubes.”

The very first race at a NHRA event they placed first, set the speed record for that class, and then held onto it for the next three years! This got the attention of Chrysler execs, and in 1961 they finally got financial help to run their first Factory Racecar, a 1961 Dodge Polara with a Ramcharger Max Wedge engine. The Dodge Division was now hard at work presenting a more racy image, and now thanks to the Ramchargers they had the hardware to back it up. Finally here was a Mopar that could go toe-to-toe with the 409 Chevy and the Super Duty Pontiac. The 1962 Max Wedge cars were all business with 3,200 pounds of pure muscle with the 424 cubic inch engine that could go from zero to hang-on in a heartbeat! It had a 13.5 to 1 cylinder compression ratio, two Carter four-barrel carburetors, aluminum Cross–Ram intake manifold, and a low restriction exhaust manifolds. This machine was built for speed. In a long overdue tribute to their home team, and maybe an attempt to share some of the glory, Dodge named these engines, the Ramcharger series. But even though this team is mostly responsible for Chrysler’s sales success and racy attitude, they were still going racing on their own time, and on their own dime! Dan Mancinni; “Any of the work done on the Ramcharger cars as was done after work hours. The factory kind of looked down on drag racing, they put it in the same category as motorcycles” he laughed. But even if some of the suits at Chrysler weren’t impressed, the Ramchargers kept on winning and they were about to start on their most successful season yet.

The 1963 racing season came blasting in on a wave of excitement, thanks to all the side-by-side racing in the previous year. The Stock Car classes were now the fan favorites. Looking at the staging lanes then, it was plain to see that the Mopar’s were in total control of the Stock and Superstock classes, but now those hot Max Wedge cars were available to everyone out there with the right timing and car dealership! For 1963 Dodge dialed it up a few more notches. Max Wedge cars were still lighter than the competition, but the hardware was even more brawny; the Sure Grip rear end, heavy-duty Torqueflight transmission and more cubic inches under the hood. This year Dodge Ramchargers engine was punched out to 426 inches with larger intake and exhaust ports and a solid lifter camshaft. Even Plymouth, that had no interest in drag racing just two years earlier, was getting with the program now. Putting their version of the Max Wedge engine in every model from the no luxury Savoy, to the upscale Sport Fury. Plymouth even called their 426 engines the SuperStock series. They were available with either a one four-barrel carburetor with 385 hp, a two four-barrel carb with 11 to 1 compression and 415 hp. Or, of course, the amazing racing version two four barrel carb with 13.5 to 1 compression and 425 hp (listed, that is, but in actuality higher). Wannabe instant track racers could even order aluminum hoods, fenders, bumpers, and doors, to save pounds on these already slim cars. These lightweight Max Wedge Mopars were the closest thing to over-the-counter racecars that anyone had ever seen. Dan Mancini; “You could drive these cars to the drag strip, remove the caps on the exhaust system to add another 90 hp, and you could race any of the Fords, Chevys, Pontiacs, and usually beat them. And if you were running the automatic transmission you would surely beat them, because the tire rubbers traction was so bad at that time. So it was a car built ready to race.”

From day one, the ‘63 Max Wedge cars rolled up the competition at every drag strip across the country. And now, thanks to the availability of all this good speed stuff, there were dozens of Dodge and Plymouth race teams armed with the parts the Ramchargers helped develop. And everybody was aiming to try and beat those red and white striped cars. As the competition heated up, the team members started to feel the effects of working a full-time job and running what was becoming a full-time racing operation. Sometimes there just weren’t enough hours in a day. The hard work, long hours, and the engineering expertise paid off nicely for the Ramchargers in ’63. The team won the Top Stock Eliminator at both the Winter Nationals and the US Nationals that year, then finished one and two at Indianapolis and also set a new class record! Not bad for a bunch of full-time engineers and part-time racers. Sailing into 1964, the Ramchargers could be sure of three things: they would be going faster; the Dodge Golden Anniversary Models would have a redesigned macho look being cooler and more youth oriented; and …there would be even tougher competition, on the NHRA tracks and of course the NASCAR tracks that the “500” models were named after. These were races where “500” would actually mean that the race was five hundred miles long, and there were actual “600” mile races as well. ‘64 is also the year that NASCAR made one of their infamous moves against Chrysler Corporation. They announced new rules that would be in place for ’65, including ordering the Dodge and Plymouth boys to take their precious Race Hemi and get out of Dodge! Thus outlawing the Chrysler Race Hemi engines and Richard Petty’s Belvedere model. In response to this new ruling, Petty, and most of the other Chrysler Factory Team cars withdrew from the ’65 Nascar Grand National Tour in protest.

There’s more to come, enjoy!

– HKK Productions

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More of My Images of the Ramchargers to come, check back soon!

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Images of The Ramchargers
Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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 “The NEW 426 V-8 ramcharger” booklet copyright 1964 by the Dodge Division Chrysler Motors Corp

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Eagle’s Nest – The Autos of The Great Gatsby Era

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Here are some rare images I shot at Eagle’s Nest – the William K Vanderbilt estate in Centerport, NY. These feature a Duesenberg, Bentley, Cadillac, and Buick – all cars featured in various The Great Gatsby films. Want more info, please see my post entitled The Mysteries of The Great Gatsby Castles – Beacon Towers and Other Places. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Images of The Autos of The Great Gatsby Era
Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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The Content is The King

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Elvis drives a 1964 Dodge Polara 500 Convertible with the boys in the band on their way to their next gig for fun and sun in the 1965 MGM film “Girl Happy”. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Elvis in a 1928 Stutz Bearcat Speedster as a tow vehicle! What’s really interesting is that he is towing a 1967 Dodge Hemi Charger to a movie Nascar race in the 1967 film Spinout. Where is that Hemi today? Comment if you know. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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(3) Images of The King in a 1964 Dodge Polara from the movie “Girl Happy”
Copyrighted 1965 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

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Image of the Elvis Soundtrack Album of Girl Happy cassette cover & Original US Singles covers
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(4) 2-Sided Images of the Elvis Collection Trading Cards
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Offset Lithograph by Andy Warhol, titled “Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Coupe” from Cars                                                                                                                                          Cars is a series of artworks by the American artist Andy Warhol, commissioned by Mercedes-Benz in 1986.

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More Dodge Racers – The Muscle Car Years

Here are a few images from my collection of Automotive Art. These are featuring the Dodge Racers from 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966 and 1970 – the best of the Muscle Car Years.

By the way, there is a typo in the copy of the trading card. It shows a 1964 Dodge Super Stock 440 on the front, but the back of the card calls it a Coronet 440. However, Dodge didn’t produce a new model Coronet (a name dredged up from the past) until 1965. (It was a mash-up of the compact Dart model line and the Standard Size line, and classified as an Intermediate.)

That’s me proudly sitting in the back of my Dad’s newly purchased 1964 Dodge Polara in one image. (The white car among the trees with a shadowy figure of a kid in the back seat.)

Enjoy! There’s more to come…

– HKK

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(2) Images of The 1964 Dodge Polara
Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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Images of the Chrysler Mopar Performance
Published and Copyrighted by Chrysler Corporation

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 (2) Images of 1964 Dodge Race Hemi
Published by Muscle Cards Copyright 1991 P.Y.Q.C.C.

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The Mysteries of The Great Gatsby’s Castles – Beacon Towers and Other Places

 

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Here are rare images that I shot over several decades at Sands Point, Long Island, NY, the site of the inspiration for the famous F Scott Fitzgerald novel The Great Gatsby. These feature Daisy & Tom Buchanan’s or Jay Gatsby’s castle, Beacon Towers, Sands Light, and others. Some of these castles are gone now, torn down & lost to time. So take a trip back in time & Enjoy! Read the story below, there’s more to come…
– HKK

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The Mysteries of the Great Gatsby’s Castles – Beacon Towers and Other Places

Part 1

There are to this day mysteries surrounding F. Scott Fitzgerald’s American classic novel “The Great Gatsby”. Most of these questions are in relation to the original inspiration for this famous fiction. Literary scholars believe that the following two actual mansions were the inspiration. The Jay Gatsby castle was in reality the property of William K Vanderbilt Jrs.’ Mother, and was called “The Beacon Towers”. The other East Egg mansion, also located in Sands Point, Long Island New York, called “Lands End”, was John Scott Browning’s and was a Stanford White design. “Lands End” being the novel’s home of Daisy and Tom Buchanan. In reality, F. Scott Fitzgerald did live across Manhasset Bay from both of them, in a guest cottage of a Great Neck Estate. He was well-known and well-documented to have been an invited guest, along with his wife Zelda to many famous wild parties that the prohibition 1920s are known for.

The Beacon Towers known as Sands Light owner and co-designer was Mrs. Alva Vanderbilt Belmont. Her son “Willy K” Vanderbilt is the world famous owner operator of the Long Island Vanderbilt Cup Auto Races. This amazing castle was located off the Long Island Sound in Sands Point. In 1917 Alva, then widowed from her second husband O.H.P. Belmont for nine years, then commissioned Richard Howland to design this Gothic fantasy castle. One of the mysteries to myself and others is why, after only a few short years, she sold the castle to William Randolph Hearst? He of course was the newspaper mogul and also the inspiration for the 1941 motion picture Citizen Kane. In that multi-dimensional film the Kane/Hearst estate is depicted in opening establishing shots from footage from another Long Island, New York Gold Coast estate the “Oheka” castle in Huntington. It was 1927 when Alva Vanderbilt Belmont sold Beacon Towers to William Randolph Hearst. Then some 45 years later in 1942, after living as might be expected a very private existence, Mr. Hearst sold this mega-castle for various reasons. The most colossal reason being the long ongoing construction (from 1919 to 1947!) of his dream castle project on the other coast in San Simeon, California. The name of this construction was of course “The Hearst Castle”, also known as Xanadu in the movie Citizen Kane. Hearst formally named his California estate “La Cuesta Encantada” (“The Enchanted Hill”), but usually called it “the ranch”.

Unfortunately five years after Hearst sold the castle to a real estate company and only 30 years after the Beacon Towers estate was hand-crafted by European artisans, they destroyed it in 1946 to build a new residence. In 2011 the New York Times reported “The mansion that was said to be the inspiration for the Gatsby home was leveled decades ago. However remains of the estate still remain intact in their original condition, including the gatehouse, carriage house, the beach sands lighthouse, and shore light tower”. And best of all, the same tower that is included in my Gallery showing of the famous “Sands Light Tower” described by F Scott Fitzgerald as the atmospheric green light. In 1982 I returned to this tip of land with my 1964 Dodge, I had driven through this place many times before, but on this visit I came to do a photographic shoot of it’s fantastic moody atmosphere that was a trip back in time and place. Unknown to me at that time was the amount of historical significance of the surviving architecture.

So if the current Jay Gatsby, Leonardo DiCaprio, gets to view my gallery site, I invite you and all of you reading this post to travel back in time and space to these “Real McCoys” of America’s “Roaring ‘20s” architectural art. It would be a perfect fit for an excellent display in a 20” x 30″ multi-image collage or a large single mounted image. So Leo, comment as you see fit…!

To Be Continued…

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The Mysteries of the Great Gatsby’s Castles – Beacon Towers and Other Places

 

Part 2

 

The forward to Mark Twain’s book “The Prince and the Pauper” reads as follows: “It may be history, it may be only a legend, a tradition. It may have happened, it may not have happened: but it COULD have happened.”

Another one of the mysteries of The Great Gatsby is who was the inspiration for Jay Gatsby and how did he become so successful? It is said in the old south that there once was an overnight millionaire by the name of George Remus, a successful criminal as well as defense attorney and also a pharmacist. It made for a good combination to come up with the very unique idea to find legal ways to profit in the Prohibition Age law known as the “Volstead Act”. Within those laws there was one that stated that pharmacists could distribute the then outlawed alcohol beverages for medicinal purposes with a Doctor’s recommendation and a prescription. Mr. Remus soon went on to dominate 80% of the U.S. alcohol consumption during Prohibition. In three years he made over $40 million, equivalent to one half of a billion dollars today. Many believe that his lavish lifestyle and extravagant parties were the inspiration for Fitzgerald’s character Jay Gatsby. Another candidate could be a bootlegger named Max Gerlach, who seems to be the inspiration for Jay Gatsby’s oft used phrase “Old Sport”.

One of the other mysteries that involve Jay Gatsby is automotive related. In the many film versions of the novel it is shown that Jay loved luxury cars, but he could not have been driving any of these models depicted in the films …not one of them. In the recent Leonardo DiCaprio version, he is driving a 1929 Duesenberg Model J. The problem is the story was set in year 1922. F Scott Fitzgerald was clear that Jay Gatsby had a predilection for English luxury to bolster his claim of having attended Oxford University, and, of course, owning a Rolls-Royce. “On weekends”, Fitzgerald wrote, “His Rolls-Royce became an omnibus bearing parties to and from the city between nine in the morning and long past midnight…” The Rolls-Royce most likely would have been a 1922 Silver Ghost, which was grandiose enough to serve as a bus. Baz Luhrmann’s recent adaptation could have used the yellow Rolls-Royce Phaeton 1 that Robert Redford drove in the 1974 film version of the book. But those filmmakers didn’t get it quite right either. The1922 Rolls-Royce produced at the company’s Springfield, Massachusetts plant was made only with right hand drive steering. Mr. Redford’s film Rolls was a left drive model. “it was also a 1928 left-hand drive was optional in 1923 and became standard in 1924 at the Springfield plant” Kristina Marchetto a spokesman for Rolls-Royce said in an email. “Hagerty”, a vintage, collector and antique auto insurance company, could not resist poking fun at the filmmakers for their choice of Gatsby’s vehicles (like a 1930 Buick in the most recent film). “While F Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby lived in the literary world of 1922, Hollywood’s Gatsby seems to be an auto enthusiast from the stock market crash year of 1929. Driving vehicles that didn’t exist when the novel was first published in 1925″, the company said in a news release. And to top it off the Duesenberg in the new movie was also a fake. It was made in Wisconsin in 1983 and has a fiberglass body and a Ford V-8. Filmmakers had bought that car and another replica Duesenberg from the Volo Auto Museum in Volo, Illinois and shipped them to Australia, where the film was shot. “Both cars were repainted and modified to look identical, to portray the same car on the screen. Said Brian Grams, the Volo Museum’s Director. Although it is generally assumed that the yellow car that hit and killed Myrtle Wilson was a Rolls-Royce, there certainly are ambiguities in the text.

But one thing is for sure, there was not much of a chance for the original Jay Gatsby to be driving a 1929 Duesenberg in an authentic historic fiction. Then again, as Mark Twain once wrote, “… but it COULD have happened”.

To Be Continued…

 

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Images of The Mysteries of The Great Gatsby’s Castles

Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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2 Images of The Beacon Towers from Fairchild Aerial Surveillance

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’64 – ’65 NY World’s Fair Through the Years

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Here are some rare images I shot over several decades at Flushing Meadows Park in Queens, NY, the site of the most famous ’64 – ’65 New York World’s Fair. These feature the now non-existent terrazzo floor of the NY Pavilion, the ’39 World’s Fair Aquatic Center, and others. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Images of The ’64 – ’65 NY World’s Fair Through the Years

Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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The 2006 Dodge Challenger RT Prototype

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The 2006 Dodge Challenger RT Prototype Story

The biggest hit of 2005’s All Chrysler Nationals in Carlisle, PA was the 2006 Dodge Challenger concept/prototype car. “There was a crowd around the vehicle all weekend long” said Ed Buczeskie, Carlyle’s Chrysler event manager. Knowing that car enthusiasts still desired great looks and an abundance of power, Dodge decided to bring the Challenger back after a 35-year hiatus. The ‘06 Challenger featured the long hood, short deck, wide stance and two door coupe body style that distinguished it in the 1970s. “We drew on the rich heritage of the Dodge Challenger, but with contemporary forms and technologies” said Chrysler Group President Tom LaSorda. “It’s not just a re-creation; it’s a re-interpretation”.

The iconic Dodge Challenger made its’ debut in the fall of 1969 as a 1970 model. While it shared the “E-body” platform with the Plymouth Barracuda, the Dodge Challenger’s wheelbase was two inches longer, creating more interior space. The Challenger was originally offered as either a two door hardtop or convertible. And with true respect to the brand’s performance heritage, the Challenger went out of the factory doors and right onto many different types of race tracks nationwide. In its’ first year, competing most notably in the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) series, Trans Am Series and National Hot Rod Association’s (NHRA) Pro Stock class. Although it was produced only from 1972 to 1974, The Dodge Challenger earned a reputation as one of the most desirable of the original “Ponycars”, with meticulously restored or super rare examples today selling for six-figure prices.

How cool is it to be able to once again walk into your local Dodge dealer and order a brand-new Hemi-Challenger, like your Dad, Granddad, or even a plum crazy purple one, like your Aunt Betty might have bought after graduating college?

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Here are some rare images I shot at the 2005 Mopar Nationals in Columbus, Ohio. These feature the Challenger RT Prototype with carbon fiber construction. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Images of The 2006 Dodge Challenger RT Prototype
Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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AAR – All American Racers

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When Dan Gurney and Carroll Shelby founded All American Racers (AAR) in 1964, they wanted to build exceptional racing cars in the United States that would gain international recognition. And that is exactly what they did.

By the time 1970 came about, Sam Posey was the driver for Ray Caldwell’s factory backed Auto Dynamics 1970 Dodge Challenger, and in Trans Am Series he raced against Parnelli Jones, also against Dan Gurney in the AAR Cuda, with Swede Savage driving for that same team. This was a time that racing historians regard as the greatest season of professional road racing in US history! These pony cars competitors were the Dodge Challenger and the Plymouth Cuda. The Dodge finished fourth in points for the 1970 season, behind the Ford Corporate Team, and the great Roger Penske’s AMC, but ahead of Chevrolet, the Plymouth Cuda entries, and Pontiac. This all done as a last minute start up team of Dodge boys ready to take on the world of road racing.

In 1970, Chrysler introduced its third generation Barracuda, and the new Dodge Challenger, a distant relative from the 1959 very limited edition Silver Challenger. This pair of new ponys gave potential racers of the future many great engine options; from basic solid 6-cylinder, through the “Big Blocks” but not at big bucks, 340-cubic inch, 383, 440, and 426 “Hemi” elephant power plants. With the 425 horses ready to nip the other pony cars in the ass. 1970 was also the year that Chrysler executives decided to add onto the corporation’s current race programs of NASCAR racing and NHRA drag racing by sponsoring Cuda and Dodge Challenger teams in the ’70 Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans-American sedan road racing series.

Trans-Am racing was getting a lot of top name drivers along with car companies spending whatever amount of money was needed to get winning results and faster road course lap time. This is when Dan Gurney was hired to manage the racing program. Dan was retired from active race driving. But he still would get behind the wheel if needed, as in the Lime Rock Connecticut race. He did not finish that race, dropping out with clutch problems. Gurney’s management responsibility would be to locate and organize the needed talent, and construct specially designed race set-ups.

Trans-Am regulations required that 2,500 examples of this model car be offered to the public. These models were the now world famous AAR Cuda and AAR Dodge Challenger loaded with the 340 cubic inch V8 with three two barrel carburetors, affectionately known as “The Six Pack”. Exhaust pipes that ended short below each door. Ouch that could get you a hot foot! The suspensions were special but turned out to be not so special for road course handling in these otherwise Super Cars. It came from the factory with larger front disc brakes, the much loved “Pistol Grip” four speed standard shifter, a matte black fiberglass hood, a big in your face air grabber hood scoop, rear wing spoiler and a quicker steering ratio. The tires were the first to be set up with tires that were one size wider in the back than on the front wheels. This is common today but new at that time. The AARs made 290 horsepower, equal to Boss Mustang streetcar, but less than Chevy’s success, the ’70 Z/28 Camaro that used a Corvette 350 with 260 horses. The ARR Cudas that Dan built for his driver, the well-named Swede Savage, cost a lot more than the street version of the Cuda’s $3,966 price tag, that even being more than $1,200 over the price of a base Barracuda. Plymouth had no problem to find eager customers to sell every one of the 2,500 AAR Cudas it was required to build that year (they actually made and sold 2,724 of this model).

The team of Gurney/Savage was not quite as successful as those car sale numbers, finishing fifth in points, behind the Dodge Challengers with a similar set up. But alas all good things must come to an end, or not? After just one extended season of great champion competitors and dramatic racing, Ford decided to drop out! Following this surprise move, Chrysler executives cut off its support and involvement for Trans-Am racing. So now with the end of its road-racing days, those factory built racers AAR’s came to an end way too soon… or is it? Chrysler Fiat has a golden opportunity to revisit one of their most successful models (and favorite car from the 1971 cult film Vanishing Point & the’90s remake) and bring it back into modern times. And it would have America right there in middle of its race history name. You couldn’t go wrong with this package’s road racing potential, and a great tire and suspension system could eliminate the wheel hop problems and win their way back to victory circle.

Back in those days, Trans Am series teams were known to acid dip the racecars to etch away the metal making the cars lighter. At Laguna Seca, the first race of the ‘70 season, the Challenger team was last in line for technical inspection. Since all the factories were participating in 1970, the first inspection of the year was highly detailed. After the Challenger had passed tech inspection and was accepted onto the race roster, the team offered John Taminus, the chief technical inspector, a beer. John sloppily rested his elbow on the roof and dented it. It was extra soft metal from an extra long time in the acid bath. So now the team was told by the officials that they could not run the car until the roof was replaced! Within an hour of the incident the Challenger team had received permission from Chrysler executives to cut the roof off a Challenger that was sitting on a dealer’s showroom floor in downtown Monterey California. They were able to perform this roof transplant and start the race on time. It was all well worth it, Sam Posey finishes in a respectful third place. Other best finishes for Sam in 1970 were third at Lime Rock, third at Road America and once again Sam Posey in third at the Kent race track.

I’m pleased to again be able to share another small part of the grand story about American muscle car history that led us up to today’s modern day muscle car classics. You can count on seeing more interesting imagery and posts in the near future. Cruise them, race them, or if you like, just take them out, show them off, and enjoy admiring them. Cheers!

— HKK

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Images of The AAR
Copyrighted 2014 by HKK Productions Inc

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Posted in Uncategorized

Chrysler Mopar Racing Legends

Here are a few images from my collection of Automotive Art. These are featuring the Chrysler Mopar Racing Legends. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Images of the Chrysler Mopar Performance
Published and Copyrighted by Chrysler Corporation

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Posted in Uncategorized

The Dependables Success Cars Of ’64

Here are a few images from my collection of Automotive Art. These are featuring the 1964 Dodge Polara, one of Dodge’s Dependable Success Cars. Enjoy! There’s more to come…
– HKK

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Images of The Dependables
Published and Copyrighted by the Dodge Division of the Chrysler Motors Corporation

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Posted in Uncategorized